SAU CFDD
Nov 172016
 
Barb Arland-Fye Lee White of Our Lady of Victory Parish, Davenport, shakes hands with Bishop Martin Amos during the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion on Feb. 22 at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Iowa City. Lee’s wife, Tricia, stands beside him.

Barb Arland-Fye
Lee White of Our Lady of Victory Parish, Davenport, shakes hands with Bishop Martin Amos during the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion on Feb. 22, 2015 at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Iowa City. Lee’s wife, Tricia, stands beside him.

Clarence Darrow, member of the Diocesan Review Board and Diocesan Pastoral Council

The bishop has placed the diocese on a sound financial footing.

He has begun to address the priest shortage by developing a system whereby the parishes are placed in “clusters.” This has enabled the use of priests to the maximum benefit of the parishioners.

Bishop Amos has led by example.  Feed the hungry — Bishop Amos has served meals to the homeless at Café on Vine in Davenport.  Visit the imprisoned — Bishop Amos has gone to Fort Madison State Penitentiary to say Mass with the prisoners.

No huge brick mansion with a Jacuzzi for our bishop — but a small, modest home where he tends his fruit and vegetable gardens and does his own home repairs.  A place where Pope Francis would be comfortable staying were he to come to Davenport.

Deacon David Montgomery, chancellor, chief of staff and communications director:

Bishop Amos came to the diocese at a time of great uncertainty.  We not only faced a growing distrust of the church but also economic issues and a forecast of fewer priests to serve. Bishop Amos met these challenges with a calm and purposeful approach, listening to varied perspectives and then guiding the steps toward a fruitful end. His steady hand and prayerful guidance have left the church in the Diocese of Davenport a better place.

Ken Miller, president of the Diocesan Pastoral Council:

Bishop Amos brought structure to the diocese. He is so approachable, so personable. When we had the Year of Mercy event this summer at St. Ambrose Uni­versity he walked to every booth, stopped and said hello and shook our hands. He is very approa­chable to his flock.

Sister Cheryl Demmer, PBVM, director of religious education, Ss. Mary & Mathias Parish, Muscatine:

Bishop Martin Amos holds a compassionate heart — a heart that embraces the lives of many as he pastors the people who have been entrusted to his care; no age — no culture — is ever excluded. His pastoral spirit is an open invitation for me to always want to grow in a deeper love relationship with the Lord. Bishop Amos knows how to go with the flow of life as he ministers to God’s people. While, personally, Bishop Amos energizes my love for the Lord, I see him as my bishop who warmly welcomes the heart of his children and his youths to living the Gospel. Bishop Amos’ heart is truly that of a Shepherd.

IlaMae Hanisch, retired from full-time ministry in the Davenport Diocese:

I think his leadership is the first thing that stands out. It’s the type of the leadership that enables and empowers others. He leaves room for that to happen and then he supports it.

I’ve seen him respond in all kinds of situations — with confirmation youths, with newly commissioned lay ministers, with parish staff, with Catholic school employees and even his own diocesan staff. I would say he is approachable. We could call him or email him and he’d get back to us. I think he responds to situations and people with fairness.

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